Brookwood 167

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What is PBIS?

PBIS is a school-wide system of support that include proactive strategies for defining, teaching, and supporting appropriate student behaviors to create positive school environments. Instead of using a piecemeal approach of individual behavioral management plans, a continuum of positive behavior support for all students within a school is implemented in areas including the classroom and nonclassroom settings (such as hallways, buses, and restrooms). Positive behavior support is an application of a behaviorally-based systems approach to enhance the capacity of schools, families, and communities to design effective environments that improve the link between research-validated practices and the environments in which teaching and learning occurs. Attention is focused on creating and sustaining primary (school-wide), secondary (classroom), and tertiary (individual) systems of support that improve lifestyle results (personal, health, social, family, work, recreation) for all children and youth by making targeted behaviors less effective, efficient, and relevant, and desired behavior more functional.

ContinuumTriangle

Why is it so important to focus on teaching positive social behaviors?

Frequently, the question is asked, “Why should I have to teach kids to be good? They already know what they are supposed to do. Why can I not just expect good behavior?” In the infamous words of a TV personality, “How is that working out for you?”

In the past, school-wide discipline has focused mainly on reacting to specific student misbehavior by implementing punishment-based strategies including reprimands, loss of privileges, office referrals, suspensions, and expulsions. Research has shown that the implementation of punishment, especially when it is used inconsistently and in the absence of other positive strategies, is ineffective. Introducing, modeling, and reinforcing positive social behavior is an important step of a student’s educational experience. Teaching behavioral expectations and rewarding students for following them is a much more positive approach than waiting for misbehavior to occur before responding. The purpose of school-wide PBIS is to establish a climate in which appropriate behavior is the norm.

What is a systems approach in school-wide PBIS?

An organization is a group of individuals who behave together to achieve a common goal. Systems are needed to support the collective use of best practices by individuals within the organization. The school-wide PBIS process emphasizes the creation of systems that support the adoption and durable implementation of evidence-based practices and procedures, and fit within on-going school reform efforts. An interactive approach that includes opportunities to correct and improve four key elements is used in school-wide PBIS focusing on: 1) Outcomes, 2) Data, 3) Practices, and 4) Systems. The diagram below illustrates how these key elements work together to build a sustainable system:

4Elements

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The Three B’s

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BE SAFE

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BE RESPONSIBLE

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BE RESPECTFUL

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Our PBIS Cool Tool for the week is…

Respect in the Classroom – Not Being Disruptive

School-Wide Expectation: Be Respectful

Purpose Of The Lesson/Why It’s Important

  1. To allow students to be more productive in class
  2. To show respect to peers and teachers

Teaching Examples

  1. The school secretary comes to the classroom door during first hour. Your teacher steps out to discuss something with her. It seems like the perfect time to visit a little, but you know that you are expected to be working. Just because the teacher isn’t watching doesn’t mean it’s OK to get off task and distract others.
  2. The teacher is teaching a lesson when your pencil breaks. Instead of going to the pencil sharpener, you use a different pencil.
  3. The person sitting across from you starts tapping his desk with his pencil. You catch his attention and shake your head “no” to remind him not to disrupt class.

Kids Activities/Role-Plays

  1. Negative: You need help but the teacher is helping someone else. You get irritated and act out.
  2. Positive: You raise your hand because you ned help. you see the teacher is helping someone else. You put your hand down and wait patiently for your turn.
  3. Role-play working on a project with one or two friends in the back of the room during study hall. Remember the goal; TCB without disrupting the class.

Follow-Up/Reinforcement Activities

  1. Provide verbal reinforcement when students make good choices.
  2. Pre-correct whenever possible.

Respect in the Classroom – Speaking at Appropriate Times

School-Wide Expectation: Be Respectful

Purpose of the Lesson/Why It’s Important

  1. To maximize quality instructional time
  2. To show proper respect to others in the classroom

Teaching Examples

  1. You think you know the correct answer to a question your teacher has just asked. Why should you raise your hand and wait to be called on?
  2. During class, you remember you were supposed to pass along information aout volleyball practice to your friend who sits across the room. What is the best way to handle it?
  3. You finish your work in study hall. You would really like to visit with your friend next to you, but you see some other students are still working and you don’t want to disturb them, so you get your library book out and read instead.

Kid Activities/Role-Plays

  1. Negative: Two students are talking disruptively as the teacher gives detailed instructions to the class. She then asks someone to repeat the directions.
  2. Positive: The teacher is instructing the class. As she asks questions, students raise their hands and wait to be called on before answering.

Follow-Up/Reinforcement Activities

  1. Compliment students who speak at appropriate times.
  2. Pre-teach behavior expected during a test.

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